Fall calving season may yield higher returns for southeastern beef producers

By: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture The vast majority of cow-calf producers in Tennessee and the Southeast using a defined calving season have long favored spring calving; however, researchers at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture have evaluated the risk and returns for a fall calving season,...

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Cotton yields not impacted by decreased irrigation during the early season

Jun 02, 17 Cotton yields not impacted by decreased irrigation during the early season

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Julia Rodriguez Decreasing irrigation for cotton crops during the early season may not affect yields and could save growers more than 54,000 gallons of water per acre, according to University of Georgia researchers. John Snider, UGA Cooperative Extension cotton physiologist, conducted research trials to determine early-season,...

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$10.5 Million In Cash Distributed Into Local Agricultural Economy

Jun 02, 17 $10.5 Million In Cash Distributed Into Local Agricultural Economy

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Ashley Layson, Senior Vice President Chief Marketing Officer  Farm Credit of Florida, a borrower-owned lending cooperative, distributed a record $10.5 million in cash patronage to qualified member borrowers Greg Cunningham, Chief Executive Officer, announced. “When our members do well, we do well and our profits are returned...

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Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Recognizes School Gardens with “Golden Shovel” Awards

Jun 02, 17 Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Recognizes School Gardens with “Golden Shovel” Awards

Posted by in Gardening, Landscaping

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services today announced the winners of the third annual Florida Farm to School “Golden Shovel” Awards, which recognize Florida students, educators and community...

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UF-developed mandarin shows increased tolerance to greening

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — While citrus greening disease has blemished the Florida industry, University of Florida scientists have developed a mandarin hybrid that seems to be winning the battle. Now, researchers are learning what makes this fruit a fighter. UF/IFAS researchers have...

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Giving Gardeners Information on Potting Media for Trees and Shrubs

Jun 02, 17 Giving Gardeners Information on Potting Media for Trees and Shrubs

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Scientific Studies

By: Dennis O’Brien With spring here, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists in Alabama have some timely advice for gardeners and homeowners who buy shrubs or trees. Their insight comes from a cooperative study with Auburn University scientists focused on the effects of pine bark and other types of potting media used with...

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Weather, pests make summer squash one of the most difficult vegetables for home gardeners to grow

By Sharon Dowdy Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Through my plant...

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UGA researcher identifies healthiest winter squash varieties

Jun 02, 17 UGA researcher identifies healthiest winter squash varieties

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Sharon Dowdy University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash by determining the varieties best suited for the area. Growers harvest winter squash, which includes pumpkins, when they are mature. Winter squash can be kept for months in...

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UF scientists prepare for devastating pest in China before it makes its way to U.S.

By: Ellison Langford GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A previously unrecognized pest is making a name for itself devastating American sweetgum trees in China. Now, University of Florida researchers fear the insect will make its way to the United States and devastate its sweetgum trees. The bug was so obscure it recently had no scientific name...

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Early Summer Success

Jun 02, 17 Early Summer Success

Posted by in Featured Stories

By:  Capt. Jason Prieto • 813-727-9890  June is here already and what a year thus far it has been. We had one of the warmest winters on record but the wind in May just seem to keep blowing causing a change in the fish patterns.  June marks the start of summer and while it might be hot, I like to enjoy the consistent light winds...

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Atlantic snook to close in state and federal waters

Jun 02, 17 Atlantic snook to close in state and federal waters

Posted by in Celebration

Media contact: Amanda Nalley, 850-410-4943 or Amanda.Nalley@MyFWC.com The recreational harvest of snook in Atlantic state and federal waters will close on June 1. Snook is also currently closed for harvest in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters, and will reopen for harvest in Atlantic and Gulf state and federal waters Sept....

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‘Inferno’ coleus has stunning orange foliage of perfection

Jun 02, 17 ‘Inferno’ coleus has stunning orange foliage of perfection

Posted by in Celebration, Gardening, Landscaping

By Norman Winter There is an ‘Inferno’ of color this spring coming from a coleus that racked up quite a number of perfect scorecards. ‘Inferno’ hasn’t been out long, but already it has heads turning, especially when you consider that it was total perfection in University of Georgia, University of Tennessee and Michigan...

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UF researchers offer tips on keeping black bears away

Jun 02, 17 UF researchers offer tips on keeping black bears away

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Imagine eating 38 Big Macs in one day. That’s what a black bear can consume – up to 20,000 calories a day. And, the animals are known to scavenge for food wherever they can find it, including garbage cans and bird feeders. Now, researchers with the...

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The paloverde is a drought-tolerant tree with distinctive green bark that’s covered with spines

Jun 02, 17 The paloverde is a drought-tolerant tree with distinctive green bark that’s covered with spines

Posted by in Featured Stories, Land Care, Landscaping

By Norman Winter I’ll never forget that rare cold morning at the National Butterfly Center in Mission, Texas. Monarchs and queen butterflies — cousin butterflies — were roosting in the retama trees waiting for the sun to warm them for flight. I had already fallen in love with the trees’ flashy display of thousands of yellow...

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Youth potato project plants seeds of STEM careers

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — When the Flagler County 4-H members started growing their own potato plants at home, they were a little worried at first. “They would come to me and say, ‘I don’t see any potatoes on my plant. What’s wrong?’” said Amy Hedstrom, a Flagler County 4-H youth development agent with the University of...

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UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney advises farmers to monitor thrips activity

May 04, 17 UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney advises farmers to monitor thrips activity

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care

By Clint Thompson With thrips activity at a high level, peanut farmers are advised to closely monitor their peanut seedlings as planting season gets underway, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney. “No matter what thrips management tactic is chosen, scouting is still a good...

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The problem expands for avocado growers: 9 beetle species carry deadly fungus

 by Brad Buck – by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.  Many people love their avocados – not to mention guacamole dip. So it was bad enough when scientists said a beetle was ravaging avocado trees in South Florida. Then scientists found out that the redbay ambrosia beetle — originally...

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Consumers will normally pay more for organic products – but not wine

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — You swish around a sip of organic wine in your mouth and it might tempt your taste buds, but that doesn’t mean you’ll pay more for it, a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows. For the study, former UF/IFAS graduate...

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As UF/IFAS CREC turns 100, it celebrates decades working with Florida Department of Citrus

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — As the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Citrus Research and Education Center celebrates its 100th anniversary, administrators are praising a decades-long relationship between researchers with CREC and the Florida Department of Citrus...

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Lenny Wells’ pecan book covers history of crop and its popularity in the South

May 04, 17 Lenny Wells’ pecan book covers history of crop and its popularity in the South

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration

By Julia Rodriguez Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist and the university’s leading voice in the pecan industry, covers the history of pecans and their popularity in the South in his first book, “Pecan: America’s Native Nut Tree.” In the book, Wells addresses the pecan’s progression...

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