UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Mar 01, 17 UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu JAY, Fla. — Do you know where your grits come from? Now, you can buy locally grown grits and cornmeal, and even visit the farm where the corn is grown. The University of Florida IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center near Jay, Florida, is selling grits and cornmeal...

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Farmers may see little effect as FDA implements ban on antibiotics in non-therapeutic animal feed

Mar 01, 17 Farmers may see little effect as FDA implements ban on antibiotics in non-therapeutic animal feed

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming, Livestock

By Merritt Melancon The market demand for organic chicken, beef and pork has been on the rise for several years, so most farmers were prepared for the new restrictions on antibiotics in animal feed that went into effect on Jan. 1. The Food and Drug Administration rule change – the veterinary feed directive – prohibits farmers...

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Crape murder? UF/IFAS researcher says trim back on pruning crapemyrtle

Mar 01, 17 Crape murder? UF/IFAS researcher says trim back on pruning crapemyrtle

Posted by in Gardening

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu With spring around the corner, many homeowners are eyeing their crapemyrtle for a good pruning or topping. But pruning may not be necessary, and take too much off and you could harm the tree, said Gary Knox, a professor of environmental horticulture with the University of...

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Crop scientists and engineers team up to help improve crops with robotic technology

Mar 01, 17 Crop scientists and engineers team up to help improve crops with robotic technology

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Mike Wooten It may be a while before robots and drones are as common as tractors and combine harvesters on farms, but the high-tech tools may soon play a major role in helping feed the world’s rapidly growing population. At the University of Georgia, a team of researchers is developing a robotic system of all-terrain rovers and...

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Florida Forest Service Releases New Fire Information App

Mar 01, 17 Florida Forest Service Releases New Fire Information App

Posted by in Health & Farming

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Forest Service today announced the release of “FLBurnTools,” a new mobile app to inform the public about drought, wildfire danger and wildfire...

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“Reflections of Nature” Exhibit in Palmetto

Mar 01, 17 “Reflections of Nature” Exhibit in Palmetto

Posted by in Celebration

For More Information: Diane Ingram, 721-2034 Palmetto Historical Park and Manatee County Agricultural Museum are hosting an opening reception for their new exhibit, “Reflections of Nature: Our Privilege, Our Responsibility” on March 4th from 2pm – 4pm. This unique exhibit will feature artwork from Florida photographers and...

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ARS Genetics Researcher in Miami is Named Fairchild Medal Recipient

Mar 01, 17 ARS Genetics Researcher in Miami is Named Fairchild Medal Recipient

Posted by in Land Care, Scientific Studies

By Dennis O’Brien Kalāheo, Hawaii, Feb. 3, 2017—Alan W. Meerow, a research geneticist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS), has been awarded the 2017 David Fairchild Medal for Plant Exploration by the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). This not-for-profit,...

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Copper Sulfate Kills Fungus on Fish Eggs

Mar 01, 17 Copper Sulfate Kills Fungus on Fish Eggs

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant Fungus on fish eggs isn’t only an eyesore for the aquaculture industry, it’s also deadly to fish and expensive to treat. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have found that copper sulfate kills fish egg fungus and is cheaper than current treatments. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists...

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AMAZING ST. AUGUSTINE FLORIDA

Mar 01, 17 AMAZING ST. AUGUSTINE FLORIDA

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

WARREN RESEN – North American Travel Journalists Assn. This is a city that continues to amaze, entertain, and educate visitors even those who have previously visited. As a frequent visitor myself, I can attest to the fact that there is always something new happening in America’s oldest continuously occupied European city. Dori...

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THE ANCIENT ART OF BEEKEEPING “THE APIARIST” HAROLD P. CURTIS HONEY STORE LABELLE, FLORIDA

Mar 01, 17 THE ANCIENT ART OF BEEKEEPING  “THE APIARIST” HAROLD P. CURTIS HONEY STORE LABELLE, FLORIDA

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Nancy Dale Dating back to the Egyptians some 5,000 years ago, humans have been keeping bees.  In those early days, humans observed wild bees flying from flower-to-flower depositing a yellow substance (pollen) and soon noticed that the flower ripened into fruits or vegetables.  Not only did early humans witness...

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UF/IFAS researcher: Cats, dogs teaming up is best way to keep rodents away

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Cats and dogs may be longtime enemies, but when teamed up, they keep rodents away, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. That’s good news for farmers trying to keep rodents from eating their crops and for homeowners...

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Get in touch with science, history at Seahorse Key open house

Mar 01, 17 Get in touch with science, history at Seahorse Key open house

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Samantha Grenrock, 352-294-3307, grenrosa@ufl.edu CEDAR KEY, Fla. — Visitors of all ages will get up close and personal with local history and wildlife at the next Seahorse Key open house, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m on Feb. 25. A pop-up aquarium of ‘touch tanks’ will let families interact with living marine animals and reptiles...

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UGA ornamental plant breeder aims to bring a new brew to the U.S. – locally grown tea

Mar 01, 17 UGA ornamental plant breeder aims to bring a new brew to the U.S. – locally grown tea

Posted by in Agriculture

By Merritt Melancon Sweet tea may be the “house wine” of the American South, but very, very few of the tea leaves used in the thousands of gallons of tea Southerners drink every year is grown nearby. Despite experiments in tea farming in the Southern U.S. dating back to Colonial times, this temperamental cousin of the camellia...

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UF/IFAS researchers find potential bugs to eat invasive cogongrass

Credit: Courtesy James Cuda, UF/IFAS GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A few bugs may be able to chew up some cogongrass, a noxious weed that elbows out pasture grass, golf course greens and valuable ecosystems, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. A worldwide research team led by UF/IFAS...

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South Georgia cotton gin donates equipment to UGA’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park

Mar 01, 17 South Georgia cotton gin donates equipment to UGA’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Clint Thompson A south Georgia cotton gin is helping the University of Georgia’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP) harvest cotton more efficiently thanks to their donation of a cotton module builder and cotton boll buggy. Funston Gin, in Funston, Georgia, donated the two pieces of equipment, valued at $25,000,...

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Making Spinach with Low Oxalate Levels

Mar 01, 17 Making Spinach with Low Oxalate Levels

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Sharon Durham Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists identified 8 spinach varieties that have low oxalate levels, which is sometimes linked to better health. Oxalic acid, or “oxalate,” is a naturally occurring plant chemical and in the human diet it’s been linked to kidney stone formation. It also can react with...

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Brussels sprouts a risky crop option for Georgia farmers

Feb 01, 17 Brussels sprouts a risky crop option for Georgia farmers

Posted by in Agriculture

By Clint Thompson Georgia’s hot summers and warm early-fall temperatures – and the intensive labor required to grow and harvest Brussels sprouts – make growing the crop too risky for Georgia farmers. Although they are a cold-tolerant crop, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research has found that, in order to grow to...

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UF/IFAS Extension Baker County breaks ground on new teaching orchard

Feb 01, 17 UF/IFAS Extension Baker County breaks ground on new teaching orchard

Posted by in Agriculture

By: Samantha Grenrock, 352-294-3307, grenrosa@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — If you want to know how best to prune a fruit tree or even how to plant one, Alicia Lamborn can do more than just tell you—she can take you out back and show you.Lamborn, a horticulture agent with the University of Florida Institute of Food and...

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Plant berries now to create your own backyard blackberry patch

Feb 01, 17 Plant berries now to create your own backyard blackberry patch

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Michael J. Wheeler At one time, an almost unlimited number of wild blackberries and dewberries – the blackberry’s trailing cousin – grew along fencerows and in abandoned fields. Many of these sites have been destroyed or now have “No trespassing” signs posted on them, but each spring I still see couples on roadsides...

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Hillsborough County pesticide collection aides farmers, protects environment

By: Samantha Grenrock, 352-294-3307, grenrosa@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — When a pesticide is discontinued or banned by the U.S. Department of Environmental Protection, farmers may opt to store these products until they figure out how to dispose of them properly, says Stephen Gran, director of the University of Florida Institute...

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