Blueberry Bush Pruning Timing

By Sharon Durham New blueberry varieties developed for northern growing areas in the United States are often hybrids of northern-adapted and southern-adapted breeding material. Such hybrids may retain their leaves longer in the fall, and appear to be slow to enter dormancy. Blueberry growers prune their bushes annually to remove old...

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Fumigation a potential management tool for Georgia watermelon farmers fighting fusarium wilt disease

By Clint Thompson Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation. Fumigation is a method of pest control that involves using volatile compounds in a restricted area to kill pests and pathogens. Research on the...

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New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease

Jul 03, 17 New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Julia Rodriguez University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia. If the research proves successful,...

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Scientists find way to surgically strike out weeds that impede crop growth

Jul 03, 17 Scientists find way to surgically strike out weeds that impede crop growth

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care, Scientific Studies

by Brad Buck. • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural  By using a combination of fumigants, University of Florida scientists believe they can surgically strike out some weeds that otherwise get in the way of vegetable growth. Researchers with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences have shown that...

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Eat Your Greens—Microgreens, That is!

Jul 03, 17 Eat Your Greens—Microgreens, That is!

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Jan Suszkiw, ARS Office of Communications. Small edible plants called microgreens aren’t just tasty toppings for soups, salads and sandwiches. They’re also healthful. According to results of an Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-led study, eating red cabbage microgreens helped mice moderate their weight and cholesterol...

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New Silver-Cotton Fibers Battle Bacteria

By Sandra Avant Silver has been used as an antimicrobial agent for more than 100 years. Today, silver in the form of nanoparticles is incorporated in such products as plastic food containers, medical materials, and clothing. In textiles, however, preventing the nanoparticles’ antimicrobial properties from washing away has always...

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Cotton yields not impacted by decreased irrigation during the early season

Jun 02, 17 Cotton yields not impacted by decreased irrigation during the early season

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Julia Rodriguez Decreasing irrigation for cotton crops during the early season may not affect yields and could save growers more than 54,000 gallons of water per acre, according to University of Georgia researchers. John Snider, UGA Cooperative Extension cotton physiologist, conducted research trials to determine early-season,...

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$10.5 Million In Cash Distributed Into Local Agricultural Economy

Jun 02, 17 $10.5 Million In Cash Distributed Into Local Agricultural Economy

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Ashley Layson, Senior Vice President Chief Marketing Officer  Farm Credit of Florida, a borrower-owned lending cooperative, distributed a record $10.5 million in cash patronage to qualified member borrowers Greg Cunningham, Chief Executive Officer, announced. “When our members do well, we do well and our profits are returned...

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UF-developed mandarin shows increased tolerance to greening

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — While citrus greening disease has blemished the Florida industry, University of Florida scientists have developed a mandarin hybrid that seems to be winning the battle. Now, researchers are learning what makes this fruit a fighter. UF/IFAS researchers have...

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Weather, pests make summer squash one of the most difficult vegetables for home gardeners to grow

By Sharon Dowdy Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “Through my plant...

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UGA researcher identifies healthiest winter squash varieties

Jun 02, 17 UGA researcher identifies healthiest winter squash varieties

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Sharon Dowdy University of Georgia graduate student Zach Matteen is on a mission to convince more backyard gardeners and farmers to grow winter squash by determining the varieties best suited for the area. Growers harvest winter squash, which includes pumpkins, when they are mature. Winter squash can be kept for months in...

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Youth potato project plants seeds of STEM careers

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — When the Flagler County 4-H members started growing their own potato plants at home, they were a little worried at first. “They would come to me and say, ‘I don’t see any potatoes on my plant. What’s wrong?’” said Amy Hedstrom, a Flagler County 4-H youth development agent with the University of...

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UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney advises farmers to monitor thrips activity

May 04, 17 UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney advises farmers to monitor thrips activity

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care

By Clint Thompson With thrips activity at a high level, peanut farmers are advised to closely monitor their peanut seedlings as planting season gets underway, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney. “No matter what thrips management tactic is chosen, scouting is still a good...

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The problem expands for avocado growers: 9 beetle species carry deadly fungus

 by Brad Buck – by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.  Many people love their avocados – not to mention guacamole dip. So it was bad enough when scientists said a beetle was ravaging avocado trees in South Florida. Then scientists found out that the redbay ambrosia beetle — originally...

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Consumers will normally pay more for organic products – but not wine

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — You swish around a sip of organic wine in your mouth and it might tempt your taste buds, but that doesn’t mean you’ll pay more for it, a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows. For the study, former UF/IFAS graduate...

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As UF/IFAS CREC turns 100, it celebrates decades working with Florida Department of Citrus

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — As the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Citrus Research and Education Center celebrates its 100th anniversary, administrators are praising a decades-long relationship between researchers with CREC and the Florida Department of Citrus...

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Lenny Wells’ pecan book covers history of crop and its popularity in the South

May 04, 17 Lenny Wells’ pecan book covers history of crop and its popularity in the South

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration

By Julia Rodriguez Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist and the university’s leading voice in the pecan industry, covers the history of pecans and their popularity in the South in his first book, “Pecan: America’s Native Nut Tree.” In the book, Wells addresses the pecan’s progression...

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Saving Costs with Cover Crops

May 04, 17 Saving Costs with Cover Crops

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Dennis O’Brien Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have found a cost-saving strategy for cotton growers in Alabama who use cover crops. Cover crops are gaining popularity because they suppress weeds and help soil retain moisture and nutrients. Farmers typically plant cover crops in the fall and kill them in the...

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Catfish Genome: A New Tool to Help Improve Catfish Products

May 04, 17 Catfish Genome: A New Tool to Help Improve Catfish Products

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Sandra Avant A fish named “Coco” is at the center of the first genome sequence for any catfish species. Catfish is an important dietary protein source and is the third most commonly farmed fish worldwide. While more than 2,500 species of catfish are known to exist, the channel catfish dominates U.S. aquaculture, accounting...

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UGARF names Ozias-Akins Distinguished Research Professor

By Sharon Dowdy The University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF) has named Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins a Distinguished Research Professor, a title awarded to UGA faculty recognized internationally for their contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. In 2015, she was...

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