Annual Southeastern Hay Contest deadline set for September 21

Aug 01, 17 Annual Southeastern Hay Contest deadline set for September 21

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By Merritt Melancon, Dennis Hancock While laymen may look at a farm field dotted with round bales and think that those bales are all the same, forage farmers and livestock producers know the truth. Hay quality varies widely from producer to producer and from year to year. Each fall, the Southeastern Hay Contest gives forage and...

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Chlorine Dioxide Pouches Make Produce Safer

Aug 01, 17 Chlorine Dioxide Pouches Make Produce Safer

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Tech

By Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Florida are helping a company develop a small plastic pouch designed to make produce safer. The pouch releases chlorine dioxide gas, which eliminates Escherichia coli bacteria and other pathogens from the surfaces of fruits and...

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Colored Rice May Brighten the Menu for Diabetics in the Future

By: Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. When it comes to healthful foods, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are some choices that come to mind. But how about rice—colored rice that is? Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are investigating the potential of brown, purple and red rice in managing diabetes. Rice...

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Commissioner Adam Putnam’s Statement Regarding Phosphorous Reduction in Everglades Agricultural Area

Aug 01, 17 Commissioner Adam Putnam’s Statement Regarding Phosphorous Reduction in Everglades Agricultural Area

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Land Care

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam released the following statement regarding the South Florida Water Management District’s announcement that for the Water Year 2017 monitoring period, the Everglades...

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Begin managing dove fields now — season is just months away

Aug 01, 17 Begin managing dove fields now — season is just months away

Posted by in Agriculture

By Michael Anthony Foster Opening day of dove season is a little over two months away, so it’s time to start planning for and planting dove fields. A prudently planned dove field can provide family entertainment and economic benefits through most of the dove season, which starts Sept. 2. Field owners can often charge $25 to $75...

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Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Aug 01, 17 Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Some people love to eat a juicy, seedless watermelon for a tasty, refreshing snack during a hot, Florida summer day. University of Florida scientists have found a way to stave off potential diseases while retaining that flavor. Consumers increasingly savor the...

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Commissioner Adam Putnam Names Dr. Martha Rhodes Roberts as 2017 Woman of the Year in Agriculture

Aug 01, 17 Commissioner Adam Putnam Names Dr. Martha Rhodes Roberts as 2017 Woman of the Year in Agriculture

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. –  Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam today announced that Dr. Martha Rhodes Roberts has been named the 2017 Woman of the Year in Agriculture. Dr. Roberts dedicated 35 years of service to the Florida Department of...

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With $3 million grant, researchers hope to help find sites to grow tomorrow’s produce

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers are sounding a warning bell that fresh produce may be hard to come by in the future. Scientists with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences cite changes in our climate, loss of fresh water and competition for resources...

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Pineapples: Preservation and Potential

By Jan Suszkiw, ARS Office of Communications. Starting around 1898, key advances in production and processing methods—built around the superstar variety Smooth Cayenne—positioned Hawaii as a world leader in exports of canned pineapple. Although the state no longer holds that title, Hawaii today remains home to one of the...

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New Sensor System for Peanut Drying

By Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) engineers in Georgia have developed a network of sensors that will save thousands of dollars in drying costs for peanut growers and processors. When peanut farmers in Georgia sell their crop, they bring it to a buying point to be graded and...

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New Eco-Friendly Barleys Have Many Benefits

By Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. Two new barley varieties are good for growers, the environment, and nonruminant animals. Barley and other cereal grains and legumes contain a form of phosphorus called “phytate.” Phosphorus is an essential nutrient, but phytate cannot be digested by humans and nonruminant animals,...

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Blueberry Bush Pruning Timing

By Sharon Durham New blueberry varieties developed for northern growing areas in the United States are often hybrids of northern-adapted and southern-adapted breeding material. Such hybrids may retain their leaves longer in the fall, and appear to be slow to enter dormancy. Blueberry growers prune their bushes annually to remove old...

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Fumigation a potential management tool for Georgia watermelon farmers fighting fusarium wilt disease

By Clint Thompson Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation. Fumigation is a method of pest control that involves using volatile compounds in a restricted area to kill pests and pathogens. Research on the...

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New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease

Jul 03, 17 New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Julia Rodriguez University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia. If the research proves successful,...

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Scientists find way to surgically strike out weeds that impede crop growth

Jul 03, 17 Scientists find way to surgically strike out weeds that impede crop growth

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care, Scientific Studies

by Brad Buck. • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural  By using a combination of fumigants, University of Florida scientists believe they can surgically strike out some weeds that otherwise get in the way of vegetable growth. Researchers with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences have shown that...

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Eat Your Greens—Microgreens, That is!

Jul 03, 17 Eat Your Greens—Microgreens, That is!

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Jan Suszkiw, ARS Office of Communications. Small edible plants called microgreens aren’t just tasty toppings for soups, salads and sandwiches. They’re also healthful. According to results of an Agricultural Research Service (ARS)-led study, eating red cabbage microgreens helped mice moderate their weight and cholesterol...

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New Silver-Cotton Fibers Battle Bacteria

By Sandra Avant Silver has been used as an antimicrobial agent for more than 100 years. Today, silver in the form of nanoparticles is incorporated in such products as plastic food containers, medical materials, and clothing. In textiles, however, preventing the nanoparticles’ antimicrobial properties from washing away has always...

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Cotton yields not impacted by decreased irrigation during the early season

Jun 02, 17 Cotton yields not impacted by decreased irrigation during the early season

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Julia Rodriguez Decreasing irrigation for cotton crops during the early season may not affect yields and could save growers more than 54,000 gallons of water per acre, according to University of Georgia researchers. John Snider, UGA Cooperative Extension cotton physiologist, conducted research trials to determine early-season,...

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$10.5 Million In Cash Distributed Into Local Agricultural Economy

Jun 02, 17 $10.5 Million In Cash Distributed Into Local Agricultural Economy

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Ashley Layson, Senior Vice President Chief Marketing Officer  Farm Credit of Florida, a borrower-owned lending cooperative, distributed a record $10.5 million in cash patronage to qualified member borrowers Greg Cunningham, Chief Executive Officer, announced. “When our members do well, we do well and our profits are returned...

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UF-developed mandarin shows increased tolerance to greening

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — While citrus greening disease has blemished the Florida industry, University of Florida scientists have developed a mandarin hybrid that seems to be winning the battle. Now, researchers are learning what makes this fruit a fighter. UF/IFAS researchers have...

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