Youth potato project plants seeds of STEM careers

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — When the Flagler County 4-H members started growing their own potato plants at home, they were a little worried at first. “They would come to me and say, ‘I don’t see any potatoes on my plant. What’s wrong?’” said Amy Hedstrom, a Flagler County 4-H youth development agent with the University of...

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UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney advises farmers to monitor thrips activity

May 04, 17 UGA peanut entomologist Mark Abney advises farmers to monitor thrips activity

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care

By Clint Thompson With thrips activity at a high level, peanut farmers are advised to closely monitor their peanut seedlings as planting season gets underway, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension peanut entomologist Mark Abney. “No matter what thrips management tactic is chosen, scouting is still a good...

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The problem expands for avocado growers: 9 beetle species carry deadly fungus

 by Brad Buck – by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.  Many people love their avocados – not to mention guacamole dip. So it was bad enough when scientists said a beetle was ravaging avocado trees in South Florida. Then scientists found out that the redbay ambrosia beetle — originally...

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Consumers will normally pay more for organic products – but not wine

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — You swish around a sip of organic wine in your mouth and it might tempt your taste buds, but that doesn’t mean you’ll pay more for it, a new University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows. For the study, former UF/IFAS graduate...

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As UF/IFAS CREC turns 100, it celebrates decades working with Florida Department of Citrus

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — As the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Citrus Research and Education Center celebrates its 100th anniversary, administrators are praising a decades-long relationship between researchers with CREC and the Florida Department of Citrus...

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Lenny Wells’ pecan book covers history of crop and its popularity in the South

May 04, 17 Lenny Wells’ pecan book covers history of crop and its popularity in the South

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration

By Julia Rodriguez Lenny Wells, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist and the university’s leading voice in the pecan industry, covers the history of pecans and their popularity in the South in his first book, “Pecan: America’s Native Nut Tree.” In the book, Wells addresses the pecan’s progression...

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Saving Costs with Cover Crops

May 04, 17 Saving Costs with Cover Crops

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Dennis O’Brien Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have found a cost-saving strategy for cotton growers in Alabama who use cover crops. Cover crops are gaining popularity because they suppress weeds and help soil retain moisture and nutrients. Farmers typically plant cover crops in the fall and kill them in the...

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Catfish Genome: A New Tool to Help Improve Catfish Products

May 04, 17 Catfish Genome: A New Tool to Help Improve Catfish Products

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Sandra Avant A fish named “Coco” is at the center of the first genome sequence for any catfish species. Catfish is an important dietary protein source and is the third most commonly farmed fish worldwide. While more than 2,500 species of catfish are known to exist, the channel catfish dominates U.S. aquaculture, accounting...

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UGARF names Ozias-Akins Distinguished Research Professor

By Sharon Dowdy The University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF) has named Professor Peggy Ozias-Akins a Distinguished Research Professor, a title awarded to UGA faculty recognized internationally for their contributions to knowledge and whose work promises to foster continued creativity in their discipline. In 2015, she was...

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A New Way To Pasteurize Eggs

By: Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. An Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist in Pennsylvania and his colleagues have developed a technology that rapidly pasteurizes eggs and could sharply reduce the number of illnesses caused each year by egg-borne Salmonella bacteria. The device invented by David Geveke, a...

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Common pesticide damages honey bees’ ability to fly

by University of California San Diego Biologists at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time that a widely used pesticide can significantly impair the ability of otherwise healthy honey bees to fly, raising concerns about how pesticides affect their capacity to pollinate and the long-term effects...

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Increase in exports main reason cotton prices are up

Apr 04, 17 Increase in exports main reason cotton prices are up

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Julia Rodriguez Georgia growers can expect to make at least 5 to 6 cents more per pound of cotton than they received this time last year, according to Don Shurley, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton economist. The price is due to many factors, but the main cause is the increase in exports. “Most of our cotton...

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Grapefruit for dessert? South Korea could be a lucrative market for Florida growers

Apr 04, 17 Grapefruit for dessert? South Korea could be a lucrative market for Florida growers

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — How about grapefruit as a dessert or snack? That is how many South Koreans, especially younger ones, view the fruit. Therefore, Florida grapefruit growers may want to expand their shipments to that Asian nation, University of Florida Institute of Food and...

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Maximizing Profits with Poultry Litter

For more information contact Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. A Mississippi-based Agricultural Research Service (ARS) researcher has learned that using poultry litter as fertilizer can help cotton growers in the Southeast maximize profits. Poultry litter (chicken manure, spilled feed, excess feathers, and other...

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Keep backyard chicken flocks safe

By Sharon Dowdy Avian influenza was detected on March 3, 2017, in a commercial chicken flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee, less than 100 miles from the Georgia state line. Tests revealed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI). The farm was quarantined and the birds were depopulated. Avian influenza has not been...

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Native to the South, ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight’ is semi-evergreen, tough and tolerant.

Apr 04, 17 Native to the South, ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight’ is semi-evergreen, tough and tolerant.

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Gardening

By Norman Winter It’s been amusing watching visitors get out of their cars and start taking photos of shrubs around the parking lot at the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens. Sometimes we even laughingly call these tough-as-nails plants “parking lot shrubs.” I am referring to ‘Mrs. Schiller’s...

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UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Mar 01, 17 UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu JAY, Fla. — Do you know where your grits come from? Now, you can buy locally grown grits and cornmeal, and even visit the farm where the corn is grown. The University of Florida IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center near Jay, Florida, is selling grits and cornmeal...

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Crop scientists and engineers team up to help improve crops with robotic technology

Mar 01, 17 Crop scientists and engineers team up to help improve crops with robotic technology

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Mike Wooten It may be a while before robots and drones are as common as tractors and combine harvesters on farms, but the high-tech tools may soon play a major role in helping feed the world’s rapidly growing population. At the University of Georgia, a team of researchers is developing a robotic system of all-terrain rovers and...

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Copper Sulfate Kills Fungus on Fish Eggs

Mar 01, 17 Copper Sulfate Kills Fungus on Fish Eggs

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant Fungus on fish eggs isn’t only an eyesore for the aquaculture industry, it’s also deadly to fish and expensive to treat. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have found that copper sulfate kills fish egg fungus and is cheaper than current treatments. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists...

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UGA ornamental plant breeder aims to bring a new brew to the U.S. – locally grown tea

Mar 01, 17 UGA ornamental plant breeder aims to bring a new brew to the U.S. – locally grown tea

Posted by in Agriculture

By Merritt Melancon Sweet tea may be the “house wine” of the American South, but very, very few of the tea leaves used in the thousands of gallons of tea Southerners drink every year is grown nearby. Despite experiments in tea farming in the Southern U.S. dating back to Colonial times, this temperamental cousin of the camellia...

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