Florida-grown olive oil potential is limitless

Oct 01, 17 Florida-grown olive oil potential is limitless

Posted by in Agriculture

By Vicky Boyd With the United States producing only a fraction of the total olive oil consumed nationally each year, the potential for Florida-grown olive oil is nearly limitless. “We consume about 80 million gallons of olive oil a year, and we (the United States) produce maybe 3 to 4 percent of that,” said Michael O’Hara...

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Produce industry trends – 2017 and beyond

By Doug Ohlemeier Consumers – particularly millennials – are requesting more convenient and healthier foods, which is changing how produce is sold in stores and offered in restaurants. Millennials – those born after 1980 and the first generation to come of age in the new millennium – are influencing produce purchases and...

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Research key to pomegranate success

Oct 01, 17 Research key to pomegranate success

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Vicky Boyd Florida’s fledgling pomegranate industry will continue to sprout, growers and researchers say, although work remains to be done in managing the diseases that plague pomegranate trees. After 10 years of conducting trials into suitable varieties and related cultural practices, Bill Castle remains optimistic, and...

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Code breakers unlock pearl millet’s heat tolerance to fight climate chaos

By Merritt Melancon A global team of 65 scientists, including nine from the University of Georgia, have decoded some of the secrets to the crop’s coping strategies. The newly sequenced and decoded pearl millet genome, published Sept. 18 in the journal Nature Biotechnology, will help crop breeders create more drought-tolerant...

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Sod field day set for Oct. 31, Nov. 1 in Ft. Valley and Perry

By Sharon Dowdy Georgia turfgrass producers and industry leaders will gather Tuesday, Oct. 31, and Wednesday, Nov. 1, in Ft. Valley, Georgia, for the annual Georgia Sod and Turf Producers Field Day. Industry leaders and university experts will provide updates on turfgrass-related topics, and the latest equipment will be displayed...

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Irma destroys an estimated 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop

Oct 01, 17 Irma destroys an estimated 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Scientific Studies

By Clint Thompson Irma’s destructive path blew through Georgia’s pecan crop, but the destruction could have been much worse, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. All orchards experienced some damage from the storm that moved through Georgia on Monday, Sept. 11. Nuts were blown...

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Fall in love with ‘Patti Faye,’ the most exquisite deodar cedar

Oct 01, 17 Fall in love with ‘Patti Faye,’ the most exquisite deodar cedar

Posted by in Agriculture, Gardening

By Norman Winter Just over four years ago, I wrote an article titled “Deodar Cedar, simply unbeatable in the winter landscape.” That still holds true, but I would like to suggest a new title: “‘Patti Faye’ deodar cedar, simply unbeatable in the landscape.” Every day, as I come into the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at...

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Broccoli That Can Take the Heat

By Sharon Durham, ARS Office of Communications. Broccoli is becoming more popular with the American consumer, providing plenty of nutrients in the diet. But it isn’t easy getting this cool-weather vegetable to your table. Broccoli producers face many factors that impede getting their crop to market—including unexpected...

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Photo Release: Commissioner Adam H. Putnam Surveys Citrus Groves Damaged by Hurricane Irma

Oct 01, 17 Photo Release: Commissioner Adam H. Putnam Surveys Citrus Groves Damaged by Hurricane Irma

Posted by in Agriculture

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam took an aerial tour to survey areas impacted by Hurricane Irma, including citrus groves in Central and Southwest Florida. Commissioner Putnam said, “It’s still too early to know the full...

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No flowers? No problem. UF study shows bees have other ways of finding sugar

by beverlymjames@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — What’s a bee to do when there are very few flowers available and it needs a sugar fix? Wild bees may be responding to climate change and urban expansion by relying on insects to get the sweet stuff, according to a study by Joan Meiners, a Ph.D. student in the University of Florida...

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Two-day grazing school tackles fencing and soil health in detail

Sep 01, 17 Two-day grazing school tackles fencing and soil health in detail

Posted by in Agriculture, Livestock, Scientific Studies

By Dennis Hancock A two-day Advanced Grazing School, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists Sept. 19-20, will provide a deeper understanding of grazing systems to those in attendance. The first day will focus on low-cost fencing and portable watering systems. On the second day of the program, specialists...

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New Vaccine Fights Multiple Salmonella Types

Sep 01, 17 New Vaccine Fights Multiple Salmonella Types

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Livestock

By Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. Some types of Salmonella cause disease in food animals. Other types cause foodborne disease in humans. A new vaccine developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Ames, Iowa, protects pigs against both types of Salmonella. Several Salmonella vaccines are currently...

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New UGA faculty get hands-on lessons in agriculture on annual New Faculty Tour

By Clint Thompson Agriculture — Georgia’s top industry — was featured prominently this week at stops on the University of Georgia Griffin and Tifton campuses during the university’s annual New Faculty Tour. The tour, which introduces new UGA faculty members to economic mainstays throughout the state during a five-day trip,...

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Controlling Weeds in a Way that Saves the Soil and Costs Less

Sep 01, 17 Controlling Weeds in a Way that Saves the Soil and Costs Less

Posted by in Agriculture

By: Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. An onslaught of the weed Palmer amaranth in the southeastern United States has left many farmers wondering if they should continue using environmentally friendly cover crops and conservation tillage, or switch to conventional tillage. Palmer amaranth is aggressive, drought...

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Annual Southeastern Hay Contest deadline set for September 21

Aug 01, 17 Annual Southeastern Hay Contest deadline set for September 21

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By Merritt Melancon, Dennis Hancock While laymen may look at a farm field dotted with round bales and think that those bales are all the same, forage farmers and livestock producers know the truth. Hay quality varies widely from producer to producer and from year to year. Each fall, the Southeastern Hay Contest gives forage and...

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Chlorine Dioxide Pouches Make Produce Safer

Aug 01, 17 Chlorine Dioxide Pouches Make Produce Safer

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Tech

By Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Florida are helping a company develop a small plastic pouch designed to make produce safer. The pouch releases chlorine dioxide gas, which eliminates Escherichia coli bacteria and other pathogens from the surfaces of fruits and...

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Colored Rice May Brighten the Menu for Diabetics in the Future

By: Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. When it comes to healthful foods, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are some choices that come to mind. But how about rice—colored rice that is? Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are investigating the potential of brown, purple and red rice in managing diabetes. Rice...

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Commissioner Adam Putnam’s Statement Regarding Phosphorous Reduction in Everglades Agricultural Area

Aug 01, 17 Commissioner Adam Putnam’s Statement Regarding Phosphorous Reduction in Everglades Agricultural Area

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Land Care

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam released the following statement regarding the South Florida Water Management District’s announcement that for the Water Year 2017 monitoring period, the Everglades...

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Begin managing dove fields now — season is just months away

Aug 01, 17 Begin managing dove fields now — season is just months away

Posted by in Agriculture

By Michael Anthony Foster Opening day of dove season is a little over two months away, so it’s time to start planning for and planting dove fields. A prudently planned dove field can provide family entertainment and economic benefits through most of the dove season, which starts Sept. 2. Field owners can often charge $25 to $75...

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Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Aug 01, 17 Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Some people love to eat a juicy, seedless watermelon for a tasty, refreshing snack during a hot, Florida summer day. University of Florida scientists have found a way to stave off potential diseases while retaining that flavor. Consumers increasingly savor the...

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