Increase in exports main reason cotton prices are up

Apr 04, 17 Increase in exports main reason cotton prices are up

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Julia Rodriguez Georgia growers can expect to make at least 5 to 6 cents more per pound of cotton than they received this time last year, according to Don Shurley, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension cotton economist. The price is due to many factors, but the main cause is the increase in exports. “Most of our cotton...

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Grapefruit for dessert? South Korea could be a lucrative market for Florida growers

Apr 04, 17 Grapefruit for dessert? South Korea could be a lucrative market for Florida growers

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — How about grapefruit as a dessert or snack? That is how many South Koreans, especially younger ones, view the fruit. Therefore, Florida grapefruit growers may want to expand their shipments to that Asian nation, University of Florida Institute of Food and...

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Maximizing Profits with Poultry Litter

For more information contact Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. A Mississippi-based Agricultural Research Service (ARS) researcher has learned that using poultry litter as fertilizer can help cotton growers in the Southeast maximize profits. Poultry litter (chicken manure, spilled feed, excess feathers, and other...

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Making Melons Safer with Steam

By Dennis O’Brien Steam can more effectively combat E. coli, Salmonella, and Listeria on cantaloupes than traditional removal methods. That’s the finding of an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientist in Pennsylvania. Dike Ukuku and his colleagues at the ARS Food Safety and Intervention Technologies Unit in Wyndmoor has...

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Keep backyard chicken flocks safe

By Sharon Dowdy Avian influenza was detected on March 3, 2017, in a commercial chicken flock in Lincoln County, Tennessee, less than 100 miles from the Georgia state line. Tests revealed the presence of highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza (HPAI). The farm was quarantined and the birds were depopulated. Avian influenza has not been...

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Analyzing Disease Mutations Using Online Cattle Genomes

By Sandra Avant Thanks to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists, a genomic database of U.S. beef cattle is now available online. The complete genomes of 96 bulls representing different U.S. cattle breeds were sequenced by researchers at the Agricultural Research Service’s (ARS) U.S. Meat Animal Research Center (USMARC)...

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Native to the South, ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight’ is semi-evergreen, tough and tolerant.

Apr 04, 17 Native to the South, ‘Mrs. Schiller’s Delight’ is semi-evergreen, tough and tolerant.

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Gardening

By Norman Winter It’s been amusing watching visitors get out of their cars and start taking photos of shrubs around the parking lot at the University of Georgia Coastal Georgia Botanical Gardens. Sometimes we even laughingly call these tough-as-nails plants “parking lot shrubs.” I am referring to ‘Mrs. Schiller’s...

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UF workshop to help homeowners navigate HOA issues for landscaping

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu SANFORD, Fla. — Wondering if that new lawn will mean a discussion with your Homeowner’s Association? The University of Florida Florida-Friendly LandscapingTM  program offers a workshop on April 26 to help homeowners navigate the process. “Legally Speaking: FFL in The...

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Fishing Forecast

Apr 04, 17 Fishing Forecast

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

by: Capt. Ric Liles (813)601-2900 Co-host Tampa Fishing Outfitters Radio Show Hello Anglers, Why do “tug boats” push their barges? Just a little humor to start things off. I hope everyone had a fantastic February. For those of you I had the pleasure to have out last month, Thank you! February was incredible. With Spring like...

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Discover Louisiana North

Apr 04, 17 Discover Louisiana North

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

Article and photos: WARREN RESEN, North American Travel Journalists Association The State of Louisiana goes by many names: The Bayou State, Pelican State, Sportsman’s Paradise, Sugar State, and Creole State among others. Rather than a case of multiple personalities, it is a testimonial to Louisiana’s diversity.Motorists rushing...

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The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Seeking Top School Gardens

Apr 04, 17 The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Seeking Top School Gardens

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will recognize five school gardens this year with the third annual Florida Farm to School Golden Shovel Awards. The Florida Farm to School Golden Shovel Awards...

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Lionfish Panhandle Pilot Program ends May 19

Apr 04, 17 Lionfish Panhandle Pilot Program ends May 19

Posted by in Featured Stories

Media contact: Amanda Nalley, 850-410-4943 or Amanda.Nalley@MyFWC.com Panhandle lionfish hunters only have until May 19 to compete in the Panhandle Pilot Program. This yearlong lionfish removal incentive program rewards divers for harvesting lionfish off Escambia through Franklin counties. The program may be ending, but lionfish are...

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UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Mar 01, 17 UF/IFAS West Florida REC offers grits, cornmeal from grain produced on its farm

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu JAY, Fla. — Do you know where your grits come from? Now, you can buy locally grown grits and cornmeal, and even visit the farm where the corn is grown. The University of Florida IFAS West Florida Research and Education Center near Jay, Florida, is selling grits and cornmeal...

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Farmers may see little effect as FDA implements ban on antibiotics in non-therapeutic animal feed

Mar 01, 17 Farmers may see little effect as FDA implements ban on antibiotics in non-therapeutic animal feed

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming, Livestock

By Merritt Melancon The market demand for organic chicken, beef and pork has been on the rise for several years, so most farmers were prepared for the new restrictions on antibiotics in animal feed that went into effect on Jan. 1. The Food and Drug Administration rule change – the veterinary feed directive – prohibits farmers...

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AMAZING ST. AUGUSTINE FLORIDA

Mar 01, 17 AMAZING ST. AUGUSTINE FLORIDA

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

WARREN RESEN – North American Travel Journalists Assn. This is a city that continues to amaze, entertain, and educate visitors even those who have previously visited. As a frequent visitor myself, I can attest to the fact that there is always something new happening in America’s oldest continuously occupied European city. Dori...

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THE ANCIENT ART OF BEEKEEPING “THE APIARIST” HAROLD P. CURTIS HONEY STORE LABELLE, FLORIDA

Mar 01, 17 THE ANCIENT ART OF BEEKEEPING  “THE APIARIST” HAROLD P. CURTIS HONEY STORE LABELLE, FLORIDA

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Nancy Dale Dating back to the Egyptians some 5,000 years ago, humans have been keeping bees.  In those early days, humans observed wild bees flying from flower-to-flower depositing a yellow substance (pollen) and soon noticed that the flower ripened into fruits or vegetables.  Not only did early humans witness...

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UF/IFAS researcher: Cats, dogs teaming up is best way to keep rodents away

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Cats and dogs may be longtime enemies, but when teamed up, they keep rodents away, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. That’s good news for farmers trying to keep rodents from eating their crops and for homeowners...

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Get in touch with science, history at Seahorse Key open house

Mar 01, 17 Get in touch with science, history at Seahorse Key open house

Posted by in Celebration, Featured Stories

By: Samantha Grenrock, 352-294-3307, grenrosa@ufl.edu CEDAR KEY, Fla. — Visitors of all ages will get up close and personal with local history and wildlife at the next Seahorse Key open house, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m on Feb. 25. A pop-up aquarium of ‘touch tanks’ will let families interact with living marine animals and reptiles...

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UF/IFAS researchers find potential bugs to eat invasive cogongrass

Credit: Courtesy James Cuda, UF/IFAS GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A few bugs may be able to chew up some cogongrass, a noxious weed that elbows out pasture grass, golf course greens and valuable ecosystems, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. A worldwide research team led by UF/IFAS...

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South Georgia cotton gin donates equipment to UGA’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park

Mar 01, 17 South Georgia cotton gin donates equipment to UGA’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories

By Clint Thompson A south Georgia cotton gin is helping the University of Georgia’s C.M. Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP) harvest cotton more efficiently thanks to their donation of a cotton module builder and cotton boll buggy. Funston Gin, in Funston, Georgia, donated the two pieces of equipment, valued at $25,000,...

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