ProPhyt found to be effective treatment of orange cane blotch disease in blackberries

May 01, 15 ProPhyt found to be effective treatment of orange cane blotch disease in blackberries

Posted by in Featured Stories, Land Care

By Jordan Hill University of Georgia researchers have found a treatment that kills up to 70 percent of a disease that attacks blackberry plants. Orange cane blotch is an algal disease that produces orange, yellow or sometimes green spots on blackberry plant canes. After the disease dies, the cane dries out and cracks, allowing...

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UF/IFAS study: Forest managers hindered in efforts to use prescribed burns to control costly wildfires

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Forest managers would prefer to use prescribed burns every few years to help prevent costly wildfires and rebuild unhealthy ecosystems, but hurdles like staffing, budget, liability and new development hinder them, a new University of Florida study shows. Fighting...

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Florida Forest Service and Firefighter Federal Excess Program Provide More than $11 Million in Equipment to Rural Fire Departments

Mar 02, 15 Florida Forest Service and Firefighter Federal Excess Program Provide More than $11 Million in Equipment to Rural Fire Departments

Posted by in Celebration, Land Care

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com Equipment Used for Structure and Wildfire Suppression, Emergency Services and Natural Resource Protection TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam announced today that Florida’s rural fire departments...

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ARS Study Shows No Damage to Soils from Grazing of Cover Crops

By Dennis O’Brien A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist in North Carolina has found a way to encourage more growers to use cover crops in the Southeastern United States—allow cattle to graze on them. Cover crops reduce soil erosion, boost organic matter, keep more moisture in soil and sequester carbon in the soil so...

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UF/IFAS citizen science project abuzz over bees, wasps

Writer: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Citizen scientists around the world are busy as bees for a University of Florida study. A global movement called “citizen science” is gaining traction, as scientists give lay people protocols so they can collect valid data. In this case, participants build...

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Build a compost bin to reduce waste, make plant food

Jan 30, 15 Build a compost bin to reduce waste, make plant food

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Landscaping

By Mary Carol Sheffield Resolve to live more sustainably in 2015 by creating a compost pile or bin to help reduce household waste. Many items thrown into the trash can be sorted out and composted in the backyard, and benefits go well beyond waste reduction. Compost can be used to improve garden soil and make landscapes and vegetable...

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UF/IFAS scientists find potential biological control for avocado-ravaging disease

Dec 31, 14 UF/IFAS scientists find potential biological control for avocado-ravaging disease

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care, Scientific Studies

Writer: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida scientists believe they’ve found what could be the first biological control strategy against laurel wilt, a disease that threatens the state’s $54 million-a-year avocado industry. Red ambrosia beetles bore holes into healthy avocado...

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Using Poison-Frog Compounds to Control Fire Ants

Dec 31, 14 Using Poison-Frog Compounds to Control Fire Ants

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their collaborators have found that naturally occurring compounds—alkaloids—that are found on the skin of certain poison frogs can incapacitate and kill fire ants. The red imported fire ant damages crops, devastates small animal populations and inflicts painful...

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Plant fall vegetables now so they can mature before first frost

Oct 01, 14 Plant fall vegetables now so they can mature before first frost

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care

By Paul Pugliese As summer vegetables like corn and beans stop bearing, home gardeners can plant fall gardens filled with cool-season vegetables. Timing is everything Fall gardens in Georgia can be very challenging to get cool-season vegetables through the end of summer. It’s a delicate balance in starting them early enough to...

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Beloved crape myrtle in nurseries now susceptible to bacterial leaf spot, researchers say.

Jul 31, 14 Beloved crape myrtle in nurseries now susceptible to bacterial leaf spot, researchers say.

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care

Writer: Mickie Anderson, mickiea@ufl.edu, 352-273-3566 • Source: Mathews Paret, paret@ufl.edu, 850-875-7154 • Source: Gary Knox, gwknox@ufl.edu, 850-875-7162  GAINESVILLE, Fla. — It’s enough to send gardeners into conniptions. Crape myrtle, a tree adored for its bright flowers that scream summer, care-free maintenance and...

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Once established, wildflowers add to landscape, feed beneficial pollinators.

Jul 31, 14 Once established, wildflowers add to landscape, feed beneficial pollinators.

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Scientific Studies

By Frank M. Watson • UGA Cooperative Extension. Whether you plant wildflowers in huge swaths along roadsides or in tiny pocket gardens in the backyard, the vibrant colors and rich mixtures these hardy plants bring are sure to please any flower-lover’s eye and attract beneficial pollinating insects. But don’t let the word wild...

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New disease hits Georgia Vidalia onion crop.

Jul 31, 14 New disease hits Georgia Vidalia onion crop.

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Land Care

By Clint Thompson • University of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences  Georgia is the only state that produces sweet Vidalia onions. It’s also the only state where onion farmers are tackling a new disease — yellow bud. Yellow bud (Allium Cepa) turns onion leaves yellow, similar to a ripe banana. The...

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Are ants the answer to carbon dioxide sequestration?

Jul 31, 14 Are ants the answer to carbon dioxide sequestration?

Posted by in Land Care, Scientific Studies

by Geological Society of America.  A 25-year-long study published in Geology on 14 July provides the first quantitative measurement of in situ calcium-magnesium silicate mineral dissolution by ants, termites, tree roots, and bare ground. This study reveals that ants are one of the most powerful biological agents of mineral decay...

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Termites are lazy, when they aren’t eating wood, UGA researcher says

By Sharon Dowdy • University of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Homeowners who tackle termites may think the tiny insects spend their days eating wood. But a University of Georgia entomologist says 80 percent of the time they do absolutely nothing. “As a group, they always look busy. But as...

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Survey Reports Fewer Winter Honey Bee Losses

May 28, 14 Survey Reports Fewer Winter Honey Bee Losses

Posted by in Land Care

By Kim Kaplan WASHINGTON—Total losses of managed honey bee colonies from all causes were 23.2 percent nationwide for the 2013-2014 winter, according to the annual survey conducted by the Bee Informed Partnership and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This represents a noticeable drop in mortality compared to the 30.5...

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UGA sets pollinator-attracting container garden workshop in Griffin

May 02, 14 UGA sets pollinator-attracting container garden workshop in Griffin

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Land Care

Author: Sharon Dowdy EVENT DATE: May. 28, 2014 12:00 AM – 12:00 AM A butterfly and container garden workshop will be offered Wednesday, May 28 from 9 a.m. until noon at the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden off Ellis Road in Griffin. The workshop is based on research from the UGA garden and will be presented...

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On the Trail of Fire Ant Pheromones

By Sandra Avant U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are developing innovative techniques to combat one of the world’s worst invasive species, the red imported fire ant. In the United States, fire ants cost $7 billion in control, damage repair and medical care each year. They infest millions of acres in urban,...

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UGA researching ways to control pests that damage pecan tree roots

By Clint Thompson • University of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences A University of Georgia researcher is using two new traps and the beetle’s sex drive to trap and control the pest that damages the roots of pecan trees. Prionus root borers, the larval stage of the beetle, damages pecan tree roots by...

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UF/IFAS researchers on team that sequenced, assembled, and annotated loblolly pine genome

By:  Kimberly Moore Wilmoth, 352-294-3302, k.moore.wilmoth@ufl.edu Source: John M. Davis, 352-846-0879, jmdavis@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla.  — To look at the humble loblolly pine – grown in neat rows on large farms throughout the southeastern U.S. and milled for things like building lumber and paper – you would never think...

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Managing herbicide drift is important to the bottom line, environment

Mar 03, 14 Managing herbicide drift is important to the bottom line, environment

Posted by in Featured Stories, Gardening, Land Care

By Clint Thompson •University of Georgia, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Keeping herbicides from drifting off target is the law and “it’s the neighborly thing to do,” says a University of Georgia weed specialist. “If you look at our agriculture community, it’s family living next to family. If...

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