Early blooms call for patience, not pruning

Feb 01, 16 Early blooms call for patience, not pruning

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Landscaping

By Merritt Melancon With December’s temperatures mimicking spring in most parts of Georgia, it’s no wonder that so many landscape plants are confused. Last month, gardeners in all corners of the state saw their azaleas blooming and their spring flowering trees forming buds. Since then, winter weather has returned and damaged...

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Green tea impairs development, reproduction in fruit flies, study finds

by University of California – Irvine.  Although green tea is enjoyed by millions for its numerous health benefits, University of California, Irvine researchers have discovered that excessive consumption adversely affected development and reproduction in fruit fly populations. It’s unclear whether overconsumption could have...

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Tropical Fire Ant Movement Traced to Spanish Ships

Jan 05, 16 Tropical Fire Ant Movement Traced to Spanish Ships

Posted by in Gardening, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant A genetic investigation of tropical fire ants has revealed insights into the history of their movement across the globe and voyage to America, according to collaborative research between the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and university scientists. Researchers, which included scientists at the Agricultural...

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Learning What “Wood” a Termite Prefers

Dec 01, 15 Learning What “Wood” a Termite Prefers

Posted by in Land Care, Landscaping, Scientific Studies

By Kim Kaplan U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists recently tested 10 commercial lumber species to learn which woods a termite favors and spurns. Termites cause nearly $40 billion in damage globally each year and destroy parts of more than 600,000 homes annually in the United States alone. How much wood a single colony...

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Tiny fungi can weaken roots and kill trees

Nov 03, 15 Tiny fungi can weaken roots and kill trees

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Landscaping

By Stephen Pettis Urban trees tend to have shortened lives, some living no more than 50 to 80 years. Urban forests in many metro areas have started to mature and decline, and are very susceptible to trunk-rotting and buttress root-rotting organisms. Wood-rotting organisms can slowly nibble away at trunks and buttress roots. Trees...

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Georgia’s peanut farmers having difficult year with white mold disease

Oct 01, 15 Georgia’s peanut farmers having difficult year with white mold disease

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Land Care

By Tatyana Phelps  White mold disease has always been a problem for Georgia peanut farmers, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Tim Brenneman. The disease has been even more of a nuisance due to the hot and humid weather conditions this growing season. Brenneman insists that, through proper use of the correct...

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Disease causes spots on oak tree leaves, won’t kill trees

By Paul Pugliese All of the rain earlier this spring has resulted in numerous calls to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agents about leaf spot diseases on a variety of plants, including oak trees. Most fungal pathogens that infect leaves prefer cool, moist conditions during leaf expansion in early spring. As young, tender...

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Fragrant summer blooms mask “dark side” to invasive plants, like Japanese honeysuckle and privet

Jul 01, 15 Fragrant summer blooms mask “dark side” to invasive plants, like Japanese honeysuckle and privet

Posted by in Featured Stories, Gardening

By Paul Pugliese  If you’ve driven down the road alongside an overgrown fence or forested area in north Georgia lately, you were likely overwhelmed with a combination of fragrance from wild Japanese honeysuckle and Chinese privet. Many people assume they are native because they are so common, but neither one belongs on this...

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New Begonia Lines both Beautiful and Sturdy

Jun 01, 15 New Begonia Lines both Beautiful and Sturdy

Posted by in Gardening

By Jan Suszkiw Two new begonia germplasm lines developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their collaborators are now available for use in breeding elite varieties of the ornamental crop that can tolerate the heat and humidity of a Gulf Coast summer. Begonia semperflorens is the most widely cultivated type of...

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Learn to attract pollinators at up-coming class in Griffin

May 01, 15 Learn to attract pollinators at up-coming class in Griffin

Posted by in Celebration, Gardening, Land Care, Landscaping

EVENT DATE: May. 15, 2015 9:00 AM – 3:30 PM  An eco-friendly container garden class has been set for Friday, May 15 at the University of Georgia Research and Education Garden, off of Ellis Road in Griffin, Georgia. Experts from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and the University of Florida will teach...

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ProPhyt found to be effective treatment of orange cane blotch disease in blackberries

May 01, 15 ProPhyt found to be effective treatment of orange cane blotch disease in blackberries

Posted by in Featured Stories, Land Care

By Jordan Hill University of Georgia researchers have found a treatment that kills up to 70 percent of a disease that attacks blackberry plants. Orange cane blotch is an algal disease that produces orange, yellow or sometimes green spots on blackberry plant canes. After the disease dies, the cane dries out and cracks, allowing...

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Are bees ‘hooked’ on nectar containing pesticides?

May 01, 15 Are bees ‘hooked’ on nectar containing pesticides?

Posted by in Agriculture, Featured Stories, Gardening

by Newcastle University. Bees are attracted to nectar containing common pesticides, scientists at Newcastle University and Trinity College Dublin have discovered. This could increase their chances of exposure to high levels of pesticides. Previous studies have suggested that exposure of this kind can affect bees’ fitness. The...

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UF/IFAS study: Forest managers hindered in efforts to use prescribed burns to control costly wildfires

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Forest managers would prefer to use prescribed burns every few years to help prevent costly wildfires and rebuild unhealthy ecosystems, but hurdles like staffing, budget, liability and new development hinder them, a new University of Florida study shows. Fighting...

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Florida Forest Service and Firefighter Federal Excess Program Provide More than $11 Million in Equipment to Rural Fire Departments

Mar 02, 15 Florida Forest Service and Firefighter Federal Excess Program Provide More than $11 Million in Equipment to Rural Fire Departments

Posted by in Celebration, Land Care

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com Equipment Used for Structure and Wildfire Suppression, Emergency Services and Natural Resource Protection TALLAHASSEE, Fla. – Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam announced today that Florida’s rural fire departments...

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ARS Study Shows No Damage to Soils from Grazing of Cover Crops

By Dennis O’Brien A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientist in North Carolina has found a way to encourage more growers to use cover crops in the Southeastern United States—allow cattle to graze on them. Cover crops reduce soil erosion, boost organic matter, keep more moisture in soil and sequester carbon in the soil so...

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UF/IFAS citizen science project abuzz over bees, wasps

Writer: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. – Citizen scientists around the world are busy as bees for a University of Florida study. A global movement called “citizen science” is gaining traction, as scientists give lay people protocols so they can collect valid data. In this case, participants build...

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Build a compost bin to reduce waste, make plant food

Jan 30, 15 Build a compost bin to reduce waste, make plant food

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Landscaping

By Mary Carol Sheffield Resolve to live more sustainably in 2015 by creating a compost pile or bin to help reduce household waste. Many items thrown into the trash can be sorted out and composted in the backyard, and benefits go well beyond waste reduction. Compost can be used to improve garden soil and make landscapes and vegetable...

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UF/IFAS scientists find potential biological control for avocado-ravaging disease

Dec 31, 14 UF/IFAS scientists find potential biological control for avocado-ravaging disease

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care, Scientific Studies

Writer: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida scientists believe they’ve found what could be the first biological control strategy against laurel wilt, a disease that threatens the state’s $54 million-a-year avocado industry. Red ambrosia beetles bore holes into healthy avocado...

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Using Poison-Frog Compounds to Control Fire Ants

Dec 31, 14 Using Poison-Frog Compounds to Control Fire Ants

Posted by in Gardening, Land Care, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their collaborators have found that naturally occurring compounds—alkaloids—that are found on the skin of certain poison frogs can incapacitate and kill fire ants. The red imported fire ant damages crops, devastates small animal populations and inflicts painful...

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Protect landscape plants from winter temperatures

Dec 31, 14 Protect landscape plants from winter temperatures

Posted by in Featured Stories, Gardening, Landscaping

By Frank M. Watson  Landscape plants get plenty of attention during the summer, but they need protection during Georgia’s winter months. Rather than trying to keep plants warm, gardeners should help protect plants from wind, snow, ice, drastic soil temperature changes and heat from the sun on cold days. Reducing water loss can...

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