UF/IFAS Extension helps Floridians ‘take charge’ of diabetes

Nov 30, 16 UF/IFAS Extension helps Floridians ‘take charge’ of diabetes

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By: Samantha Grenrock, 352-294-3307, grenrosa@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Diabetes affects 29.1 million people in the U.S. — 9.3 percent of the population — and is the seventh leading cause of death in the country, according to the latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “In Florida, 9.4 percent...

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A Better Lure to Detect and Control an Avocado Pest

By Dennis O’Brien An Agricultural Research Service (ARS) researcher has developed a new tool to help Florida avocado producers concerned about a disease that is killing their trees. It’s a lure that makes it easier to detect and control the invasive pest that spreads the disease. Laurel wilt disease is spread by the redbay...

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Fruit Fly’s Genetic Code Revealed

Nov 01, 16 Fruit Fly’s Genetic Code Revealed

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Jan Suszkiw An international team of scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other research organizations have sequenced the complete genome of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. This pest attacks more than 260 fruit, vegetable and nut crops worldwide, causing billions of dollars annually in...

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UF/IFAS-led team finds faster, better way to detect salmonella in meat, chicken

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A team of scientists led by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers has found a faster and more precise way to detect salmonella in beef and chicken, a finding that could help prevent major illnesses. Salmonella is the lauding...

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Flushing HLB out of Citrus Trees

By Dennis O’Brien A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist is providing citrus growers with much-needed guidance about the best times to use insecticides to control Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening. HLB has cost Florida citrus growers an estimated $1.3 billion since 2005. The disease is caused by a bacterium...

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Researchers, farmers collaborate to prevent E. coli

Aug 03, 16 Researchers, farmers collaborate to prevent E. coli

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming, Livestock

by Michigan State University.  A collaborative Michigan State University study involving microbiologists, epidemiologists, animal scientists, veterinarians, graduate students, undergraduates and farmers could lead to better prevention practices to limit dangerous E. coli bacteria transmissions. The study, published in Applied and...

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Cinnamon may aid learning ability

 by Rush University Medical Center. Cinnamon is a delicious addition to toast, coffee and breakfast rolls. Eating the tasty household spice also might improve learning ability, according to new study results published online in the July issue of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology. The study by neurological scientists at Rush...

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Unlocking Cacao’s Fungal Foe

Aug 02, 16 Unlocking Cacao’s Fungal Foe

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Jan Suszkiw U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have sequenced the frosty pod rot fungus genome. That advance could speed the development of cacao tree varieties that better withstand this costly blight. The fungus that causes frosty pod rot disease, Moniliophthora roreri, occurs in most cacao-growing countries of...

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CAES plant pathology doctoral student working to maximize the productivity of Haitian farmers

Jul 06, 16 CAES plant pathology doctoral student working to maximize the productivity of Haitian farmers

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Allison Floyd  When he started college, Abraham Fulmer didn’t know he’d study peanuts, work in international development or become fascinated with Haiti. But that’s where life led him. Fulmer, a PhD student in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,...

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Cancer-causing virus strikes genetically vulnerable horses

by Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine. Sarcoid skin tumors are the most common form of cancer in horses, but little is known about why the papillomavirus behind them strikes some horses and not others. A new study by an international research group led by scientists at the Baker Institute for Animal Health at...

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UGA, UF researchers use weather monitors to combat diseases in strawberry fields

By Sharon Dowdy University of Georgia and University of Florida (UF) researchers are using weather monitors to combat diseases in strawberry fields. The researchers are testing the Strawberry Advisory System (SAS) in Georgia strawberry fields. SAS, an app created, in part, by UF plant pathologist Natalia Peres, uses temperature and...

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Rural residents seek farmers markets, UF/IFAS study shows

May 02, 16 Rural residents seek farmers markets, UF/IFAS study shows

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu People who buy their produce from farmers markets love the freshness and nutritional value of the product. Not only that, rural residents seek out such markets more than urban residents, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. The latter...

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Mosquito may play key role in transmitting Eastern equine encephalitis in the Southeast

May 02, 16 Mosquito may play key role in transmitting Eastern equine encephalitis in the Southeast

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A mosquito species that’s very abundant in the Southeast may play a more significant role in transmitting Eastern equine encephalitis than originally thought, according to a University of Florida scientist. Nathan Burkett-Cadena, an assistant professor of...

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New device gives healing horses a lift

May 02, 16 New device gives healing horses a lift

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming, Livestock

by University of Saskatchewan.  Researchers and engineers in Saskatchewan hope a robotic lift system will help to improve the odds for horses recovering from limb fractures and other traumatic injuries. “I think it will give a lot of horses a chance that before, didn’t have a chance,” said team leader Dr. Julia Montgomery, a...

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Natural insect control without pesticides

May 02, 16 Natural insect control without pesticides

Posted by in Agriculture, Health & Farming

by Entomological Society of America.  Scale insects known as cochineals are major pests of prickly pear in Mexico, and pesticides are often used to control them. However, one prickly pear farmer has been controlling them without the use of insecticides since the year 2000. The farmer tipped off a team of scientists from the...

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Multiple factors contributing to pollinator decline

Mar 31, 16 Multiple factors contributing to pollinator decline

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming

By Stephen Pettis With reports of declining monarch butterfly populations and honeybee deaths, the plight of pollinators and other beneficial insects has been headlining the news for months now. Many factors contribute to pollinator decline. Loss of habitat, loss of food source plants and the overuse of pesticides are all likely...

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Rabbits can be rascally foes in the garden

Mar 31, 16 Rabbits can be rascally foes in the garden

Posted by in Featured Stories, Gardening, Health & Farming

By Frank M. Watson While rabbits may seem cute and fuzzy, the common rabbit or eastern cottontail can do considerable damage to flowers, vegetables, trees and shrubs any time of the year in places ranging from suburban yards to rural fields and tree plantations. Controlling rabbits is often necessary to reduce damage, but complete...

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Lowering the Risk of Infection with Grapes

By Sandra Avant Eating grapes may help obese people decrease certain types of fats in their blood that are linked to heart disease and lower their risk of infection, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) study. Susan Zunino, a molecular biologist with the Agricultural Research Service’s (ARS) Western Human Nutrition...

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Tips from UGA Extension will keep you serving squash year-round

Mar 31, 16 Tips from UGA Extension will keep you serving squash year-round

Posted by in Featured Stories, Health & Farming

By Robert Westerfield To most Southern gardeners, fried yellow squash or grilled zucchini are staples on the table during the summer. Serving up homegrown winter squash in the fall is worthy of bragging rights. While normally easy to grow, the endless choice of varieties and numerous garden pests have made growing squash a little...

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FWC recognizes Helen Roth, Florida Land Steward Landowner of the Year

Media contact: Diane Hirth, 850-410-5291; Carli Segelson, 772-215-9459 Helen Roth, a Gadsden County landowner, is the 2015 Florida Land Steward Landowner of the Year. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) recognized her Feb. 11 for the honor bestowed on her by the Florida Land Steward partnership and for her...

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