Produce industry trends – 2017 and beyond

By Doug Ohlemeier Consumers – particularly millennials – are requesting more convenient and healthier foods, which is changing how produce is sold in stores and offered in restaurants. Millennials – those born after 1980 and the first generation to come of age in the new millennium – are influencing produce purchases and...

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UF researchers to use $2.7 million grant to help stop influenza

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers will use a $2.7 million National Institutes of Health grant to study whether they can harness an unusual type of immune cell in pigs to treat and prevent influenza viruses in animals and humans. Although “natural killer T” –...

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Code breakers unlock pearl millet’s heat tolerance to fight climate chaos

By Merritt Melancon A global team of 65 scientists, including nine from the University of Georgia, have decoded some of the secrets to the crop’s coping strategies. The newly sequenced and decoded pearl millet genome, published Sept. 18 in the journal Nature Biotechnology, will help crop breeders create more drought-tolerant...

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Irma destroys an estimated 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop

Oct 01, 17 Irma destroys an estimated 30 percent of Georgia’s pecan crop

Posted by in Agriculture, Celebration, Scientific Studies

By Clint Thompson Irma’s destructive path blew through Georgia’s pecan crop, but the destruction could have been much worse, according to University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells. All orchards experienced some damage from the storm that moved through Georgia on Monday, Sept. 11. Nuts were blown...

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Broccoli That Can Take the Heat

By Sharon Durham, ARS Office of Communications. Broccoli is becoming more popular with the American consumer, providing plenty of nutrients in the diet. But it isn’t easy getting this cool-weather vegetable to your table. Broccoli producers face many factors that impede getting their crop to market—including unexpected...

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No flowers? No problem. UF study shows bees have other ways of finding sugar

by beverlymjames@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — What’s a bee to do when there are very few flowers available and it needs a sugar fix? Wild bees may be responding to climate change and urban expansion by relying on insects to get the sweet stuff, according to a study by Joan Meiners, a Ph.D. student in the University of Florida...

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Two-day grazing school tackles fencing and soil health in detail

Sep 01, 17 Two-day grazing school tackles fencing and soil health in detail

Posted by in Agriculture, Livestock, Scientific Studies

By Dennis Hancock A two-day Advanced Grazing School, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists Sept. 19-20, will provide a deeper understanding of grazing systems to those in attendance. The first day will focus on low-cost fencing and portable watering systems. On the second day of the program, specialists...

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New UGA faculty get hands-on lessons in agriculture on annual New Faculty Tour

By Clint Thompson Agriculture — Georgia’s top industry — was featured prominently this week at stops on the University of Georgia Griffin and Tifton campuses during the university’s annual New Faculty Tour. The tour, which introduces new UGA faculty members to economic mainstays throughout the state during a five-day trip,...

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Mediterranean-style diets linked to better brain function in older adults

by American Geriatrics Society Eating foods included in two healthy diets – the Mediterranean or the MIND diet – is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains,...

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Colored Rice May Brighten the Menu for Diabetics in the Future

By: Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. When it comes to healthful foods, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are some choices that come to mind. But how about rice—colored rice that is? Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are investigating the potential of brown, purple and red rice in managing diabetes. Rice...

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Establishment of more invasive species a concern for UGA experts

By Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health,...

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Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Aug 01, 17 Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Some people love to eat a juicy, seedless watermelon for a tasty, refreshing snack during a hot, Florida summer day. University of Florida scientists have found a way to stave off potential diseases while retaining that flavor. Consumers increasingly savor the...

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With $3 million grant, researchers hope to help find sites to grow tomorrow’s produce

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers are sounding a warning bell that fresh produce may be hard to come by in the future. Scientists with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences cite changes in our climate, loss of fresh water and competition for resources...

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Pineapples: Preservation and Potential

By Jan Suszkiw, ARS Office of Communications. Starting around 1898, key advances in production and processing methods—built around the superstar variety Smooth Cayenne—positioned Hawaii as a world leader in exports of canned pineapple. Although the state no longer holds that title, Hawaii today remains home to one of the...

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New Sensor System for Peanut Drying

By Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) engineers in Georgia have developed a network of sensors that will save thousands of dollars in drying costs for peanut growers and processors. When peanut farmers in Georgia sell their crop, they bring it to a buying point to be graded and...

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New Eco-Friendly Barleys Have Many Benefits

By Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. Two new barley varieties are good for growers, the environment, and nonruminant animals. Barley and other cereal grains and legumes contain a form of phosphorus called “phytate.” Phosphorus is an essential nutrient, but phytate cannot be digested by humans and nonruminant animals,...

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Waste not, want not: Byproduct of ethanol industry makes suitable cattle feed supplement

by American Society of Agronomy.  Making a living raising cattle isn’t as simple as just buying a herd and turning it out to pasture. Cattle require specific diets to maintain proper nutrition and weight gain. And how to do this in the most effective and efficient way possible has interested both ranchers and researchers for...

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Blueberry Bush Pruning Timing

By Sharon Durham New blueberry varieties developed for northern growing areas in the United States are often hybrids of northern-adapted and southern-adapted breeding material. Such hybrids may retain their leaves longer in the fall, and appear to be slow to enter dormancy. Blueberry growers prune their bushes annually to remove old...

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Give plants sun, space and air to prevent garden diseases

By Sharon Dowdy Home gardeners must fight insects and diseases to keep their vegetable plants healthy and productive. Diseases are harder to identify because, unlike bugs, you can’t easily see a pathogen, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little. “Insects can be seen on plants, but diseases...

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Fumigation a potential management tool for Georgia watermelon farmers fighting fusarium wilt disease

By Clint Thompson Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation. Fumigation is a method of pest control that involves using volatile compounds in a restricted area to kill pests and pathogens. Research on the...

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