No flowers? No problem. UF study shows bees have other ways of finding sugar

by beverlymjames@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — What’s a bee to do when there are very few flowers available and it needs a sugar fix? Wild bees may be responding to climate change and urban expansion by relying on insects to get the sweet stuff, according to a study by Joan Meiners, a Ph.D. student in the University of Florida...

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Two-day grazing school tackles fencing and soil health in detail

Sep 01, 17 Two-day grazing school tackles fencing and soil health in detail

Posted by in Agriculture, Livestock, Scientific Studies

By Dennis Hancock A two-day Advanced Grazing School, hosted by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialists Sept. 19-20, will provide a deeper understanding of grazing systems to those in attendance. The first day will focus on low-cost fencing and portable watering systems. On the second day of the program, specialists...

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New UGA faculty get hands-on lessons in agriculture on annual New Faculty Tour

By Clint Thompson Agriculture — Georgia’s top industry — was featured prominently this week at stops on the University of Georgia Griffin and Tifton campuses during the university’s annual New Faculty Tour. The tour, which introduces new UGA faculty members to economic mainstays throughout the state during a five-day trip,...

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Mediterranean-style diets linked to better brain function in older adults

by American Geriatrics Society Eating foods included in two healthy diets – the Mediterranean or the MIND diet – is linked to a lower risk for memory difficulties in older adults, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains,...

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Colored Rice May Brighten the Menu for Diabetics in the Future

By: Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. When it comes to healthful foods, fruits, vegetables and whole grains are some choices that come to mind. But how about rice—colored rice that is? Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are investigating the potential of brown, purple and red rice in managing diabetes. Rice...

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Establishment of more invasive species a concern for UGA experts

By Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health,...

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Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Aug 01, 17 Do you love watermelons in the hot summer? UF scientists

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Some people love to eat a juicy, seedless watermelon for a tasty, refreshing snack during a hot, Florida summer day. University of Florida scientists have found a way to stave off potential diseases while retaining that flavor. Consumers increasingly savor the...

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With $3 million grant, researchers hope to help find sites to grow tomorrow’s produce

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida researchers are sounding a warning bell that fresh produce may be hard to come by in the future. Scientists with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences cite changes in our climate, loss of fresh water and competition for resources...

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Pineapples: Preservation and Potential

By Jan Suszkiw, ARS Office of Communications. Starting around 1898, key advances in production and processing methods—built around the superstar variety Smooth Cayenne—positioned Hawaii as a world leader in exports of canned pineapple. Although the state no longer holds that title, Hawaii today remains home to one of the...

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New Sensor System for Peanut Drying

By Dennis O’Brien, ARS Office of Communications. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) engineers in Georgia have developed a network of sensors that will save thousands of dollars in drying costs for peanut growers and processors. When peanut farmers in Georgia sell their crop, they bring it to a buying point to be graded and...

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New Eco-Friendly Barleys Have Many Benefits

By Sandra Avant, ARS Office of Communications. Two new barley varieties are good for growers, the environment, and nonruminant animals. Barley and other cereal grains and legumes contain a form of phosphorus called “phytate.” Phosphorus is an essential nutrient, but phytate cannot be digested by humans and nonruminant animals,...

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Waste not, want not: Byproduct of ethanol industry makes suitable cattle feed supplement

by American Society of Agronomy.  Making a living raising cattle isn’t as simple as just buying a herd and turning it out to pasture. Cattle require specific diets to maintain proper nutrition and weight gain. And how to do this in the most effective and efficient way possible has interested both ranchers and researchers for...

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Blueberry Bush Pruning Timing

By Sharon Durham New blueberry varieties developed for northern growing areas in the United States are often hybrids of northern-adapted and southern-adapted breeding material. Such hybrids may retain their leaves longer in the fall, and appear to be slow to enter dormancy. Blueberry growers prune their bushes annually to remove old...

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Give plants sun, space and air to prevent garden diseases

By Sharon Dowdy Home gardeners must fight insects and diseases to keep their vegetable plants healthy and productive. Diseases are harder to identify because, unlike bugs, you can’t easily see a pathogen, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension specialist Elizabeth Little. “Insects can be seen on plants, but diseases...

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Fumigation a potential management tool for Georgia watermelon farmers fighting fusarium wilt disease

By Clint Thompson Fusarium wilt is on the rise in Georgia watermelon fields. University of Georgia scientists are studying whether this fungal disease can be managed through fumigation. Fumigation is a method of pest control that involves using volatile compounds in a restricted area to kill pests and pathogens. Research on the...

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UF scientists work to develop heat-resistant “cow of the future”

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — University of Florida scientists are working to breed the “cow of the future” by studying the more heat-tolerant Brangus cow — a cross between an Angus and a Brahman. Raluca Mateescu, an associate professor in the UF/IFAS department of animal sciences, is part...

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New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease

Jul 03, 17 New tobacco varieties could reduce levels of black shank disease

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Julia Rodriguez University of Georgia Cooperative Extension research trials of new tobacco varieties could help farmers reduce the level of black shank disease in their fields to 15 percent, according to Tony Barnes, Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension agent in Atkinson County, Georgia. If the research proves successful,...

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Florida Forest Service Announces Program for Landowners to Combat Devastating Forest Pest

Jul 03, 17 Florida Forest Service Announces Program for Landowners to Combat Devastating Forest Pest

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

Contact the Office of Communications: (850) 617-7737 • Communications@FreshFromFlorida.com TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — The Florida Forest Service, a division of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, announced today that the Southern Pine Beetle Assistance and Prevention Program will accept applications from...

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Scientists find way to surgically strike out weeds that impede crop growth

Jul 03, 17 Scientists find way to surgically strike out weeds that impede crop growth

Posted by in Agriculture, Land Care, Scientific Studies

by Brad Buck. • University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural  By using a combination of fumigants, University of Florida scientists believe they can surgically strike out some weeds that otherwise get in the way of vegetable growth. Researchers with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences have shown that...

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Pig Pens: A Look at Mirrors and Mat

By Sandra Avant Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are looking for ways to improve housing for farm animals, including pigs. Enhancing the animals’ environment can help reduce stress, which in turn can improve growth and efficiency and decrease disease susceptibility. According to the World Organization for Animal...

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