Crop scientists and engineers team up to help improve crops with robotic technology

Mar 01, 17 Crop scientists and engineers team up to help improve crops with robotic technology

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies, Tech

By Mike Wooten It may be a while before robots and drones are as common as tractors and combine harvesters on farms, but the high-tech tools may soon play a major role in helping feed the world’s rapidly growing population. At the University of Georgia, a team of researchers is developing a robotic system of all-terrain rovers and...

read more

ARS Genetics Researcher in Miami is Named Fairchild Medal Recipient

Mar 01, 17 ARS Genetics Researcher in Miami is Named Fairchild Medal Recipient

Posted by in Land Care, Scientific Studies

By Dennis O’Brien Kalāheo, Hawaii, Feb. 3, 2017—Alan W. Meerow, a research geneticist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS), has been awarded the 2017 David Fairchild Medal for Plant Exploration by the National Tropical Botanical Garden (NTBG). This not-for-profit,...

read more

Copper Sulfate Kills Fungus on Fish Eggs

Mar 01, 17 Copper Sulfate Kills Fungus on Fish Eggs

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant Fungus on fish eggs isn’t only an eyesore for the aquaculture industry, it’s also deadly to fish and expensive to treat. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have found that copper sulfate kills fish egg fungus and is cheaper than current treatments. Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists...

read more

UF/IFAS researcher: Cats, dogs teaming up is best way to keep rodents away

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Cats and dogs may be longtime enemies, but when teamed up, they keep rodents away, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. That’s good news for farmers trying to keep rodents from eating their crops and for homeowners...

read more

UF/IFAS researchers find potential bugs to eat invasive cogongrass

Credit: Courtesy James Cuda, UF/IFAS GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A few bugs may be able to chew up some cogongrass, a noxious weed that elbows out pasture grass, golf course greens and valuable ecosystems, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researcher says. A worldwide research team led by UF/IFAS...

read more

Making Spinach with Low Oxalate Levels

Mar 01, 17 Making Spinach with Low Oxalate Levels

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Sharon Durham Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists identified 8 spinach varieties that have low oxalate levels, which is sometimes linked to better health. Oxalic acid, or “oxalate,” is a naturally occurring plant chemical and in the human diet it’s been linked to kidney stone formation. It also can react with...

read more

New Test Quickly Detects Red Imported Fire Ants

Feb 01, 17 New Test Quickly Detects Red Imported Fire Ants

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant A new test kit, developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists, could limit the spread of red imported fire ants. Since the red imported fire ant invaded the United States more than 85 years ago, it has infested 367 million acres. Each year, imported fire ants cost Americans $6 billion to control and...

read more

Irula tribesmen and detector dogs help UF/IFAS and FWC remove pythons in Florida

Media contacts: FWC: Carli Segelson, 772-215-9459, Carli.Segelson@MyFWC.com UF: Beverly James beverlymjames@ufl.edu, 352-273-3566 FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. — The University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) are working together on unique...

read more

Mobile System Removes Phosphorus From Manure

By Jan Suszkiw A mobile system for removing phosphorus from cow manure may offer dairy farmers greater flexibility in where, when, and how they use the nutrient to fertilize crops. Manure can be spread onto crop fields as a source of phosphorus, nitrogen, and other nutrients important to plant growth. But applying too much manure...

read more

2016’s Top 10 UF/IFAS Extension publications cover snakes, avocados, vegetable gardening, more

Jan 02, 17 2016’s Top 10 UF/IFAS Extension publications cover snakes, avocados, vegetable gardening, more

Posted by in Land Care, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Vegetable gardening, bahia grass, living with snakes and identifying poisonous plants. These are the topics for some of the top University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Extension documents from 2016. Here’s this year’s list of the top 10...

read more

Scientists crack genetic code determining leaf shape in cotton

Jan 02, 17 Scientists crack genetic code determining leaf shape in cotton

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

by North Carolina State University Researchers know that the variation in leaf shapes can mean big differences in a farmer’s bottom line. Now, a new discovery gives plant breeders key genetic information they need to develop crop varieties that make the most of these leaf-shape differences. In a paper published Dec. 20 in the...

read more

Eat and be eaten: Invasive scavengers in Hawaii alter island nutrient cycle

Jan 02, 17 Eat and be eaten: Invasive scavengers in Hawaii alter island nutrient cycle

Posted by in Featured Stories, Scientific Studies

Written by Vicky L. Sutton-Jackson. by University of Georgia.  Researchers from the University of Georgia have found that invasive species on Hawaii Island, or the Big Island of Hawaii, may be especially successful invaders because they are formidable scavengers of carcasses of other animals and after death, a nutrient resource for...

read more

New Process Quickly Analyzes Acrylamide in French Fries

By Sandra Avant Atechnique called “near-infrared spectroscopy” (NIRS) can rapidly estimate the amount of acrylamide in white-potato French fries, according to a study by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their North Carolina State University collaborators. Acrylamide is a potentially toxic compound that forms...

read more

Berry wine, minus the alcohol, may offer help for those with diabetes

by University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences (ACES). Blueberries, and berries in general, are among foods labeled as “diabetes superfoods” by the American Association of Diabetes. Food science researchers at the University of Illinois have found that fermenting berries may improve their...

read more

UF/IFAS tips for safe holiday meal preparation

Nov 30, 16 UF/IFAS tips for safe holiday meal preparation

Posted by in Celebration, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — With the holidays approaching, you want the turkey and stuffing – or whatever you’re preparing – to be safe to eat, and consume again as leftovers. To help you, a University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences food expert gives tips to make...

read more

UF/IFAS Extension helps Floridians ‘take charge’ of diabetes

Nov 30, 16 UF/IFAS Extension helps Floridians ‘take charge’ of diabetes

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By: Samantha Grenrock, 352-294-3307, grenrosa@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Diabetes affects 29.1 million people in the U.S. — 9.3 percent of the population — and is the seventh leading cause of death in the country, according to the latest numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “In Florida, 9.4 percent...

read more

Eating dairy cheese may protect against sodium-related health risks

by Marjorie S. by Penn State Consuming dairy cheese instead of other sodium-laden foods may actually protect against some of sodium’s effects on the cardiovascular system, such as high blood pressure, according to researchers at Penn State. The researchers say the protection comes from antioxidant properties of dairy proteins in...

read more

Inherited taste perceptions may explain why some people eat too much salt

Nov 30, 16 Inherited taste perceptions may explain why some people eat too much salt

Posted by in Scientific Studies

by American Heart Association. Inherited differences in taste perceptions may help explain why some people eat more salt than recommended, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016. “Genetic factors that influence taste aren’t necessarily obvious to people, but...

read more

Soybean nitrogen breakthrough could help feed the world

Nov 01, 16 Soybean nitrogen breakthrough could help feed the world

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

by Will Ferguson • Washington State University.  Washington State University biologist Mechthild Tegeder has developed a way to dramatically increase the yield and quality of soybeans. Her greenhouse-grown soybean plants fix twice as much nitrogen from the atmosphere as their natural counterparts, grow larger and produce up to 36...

read more

Native blue mistflowers offer dazzling color

By Norman Winter When I moved into my new house about this time last year, I was quick to notice my neighbor’s flowers across the street. I could see drifts of wonderful, tall, blue flowers coupled with the complementary orange of swirling Gulf fritillary butterflies. I knew immediately that my neighbor was a real gardener, as...

read more