Fruit Fly’s Genetic Code Revealed

Nov 01, 16 Fruit Fly’s Genetic Code Revealed

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Jan Suszkiw An international team of scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and other research organizations have sequenced the complete genome of the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata. This pest attacks more than 260 fruit, vegetable and nut crops worldwide, causing billions of dollars annually in...

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UF/IFAS report: Florida agriculture, natural resources employment up 29 percent in 13 years

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — About 1.56 million people worked full- or part-time in agriculture, natural resources and food industries in 2014, an increase of about 40,000 workers from 2013, and nearly 29 percent from 2001, according to a new University of Florida Institute of Food and...

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Adequate Zinc Vital to Healthy Immune Response

Oct 03, 16 Adequate Zinc Vital to Healthy Immune Response

Posted by in Scientific Studies

By Rosalie Marion Bliss As cold and flu season nears, now is a good time to take stock of zinc intake, because adequate zinc is essential to immune response. In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS), a group of older adults with relatively low blood zinc concentrations...

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UF/IFAS study: Bringing bugs to the classroom makes everyone smarter

Oct 03, 16 UF/IFAS study: Bringing bugs to the classroom makes everyone smarter

Posted by in Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Through a curriculum appropriately titled, “Bed Bugs and Book Bags,” students worldwide are learning how to identify bed bugs, where they hide out and much more. The program teaches how to prevent the insects, and a new University of Florida Institute of Food...

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UF/IFAS-led team finds faster, better way to detect salmonella in meat, chicken

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — A team of scientists led by University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences researchers has found a faster and more precise way to detect salmonella in beef and chicken, a finding that could help prevent major illnesses. Salmonella is the lauding...

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Calving simulator offers training opportunity for cattlemen

By Clint Thompson The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences and College of Veterinary Medicine are offering a unique training opportunity for cattlemen who want more information on how to assist cows and heifers having difficulty calving. What is to be expected when delivering a calf? What is...

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Flushing HLB out of Citrus Trees

By Dennis O’Brien A U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) entomologist is providing citrus growers with much-needed guidance about the best times to use insecticides to control Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening. HLB has cost Florida citrus growers an estimated $1.3 billion since 2005. The disease is caused by a bacterium...

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Nutrition matters: Stress from migratory beekeeping may be eased by access to food

by North Carolina State University.  In the first large-scale and comprehensive study on the impacts of transporting honey bees to pollinate various crops, research from North Carolina State University shows that travel can adversely affect bee health and lifespan. Some of these negative impacts may be reduced by moving bee...

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Proper sensor placement helps farmers optimize water use

Aug 31, 16 Proper sensor placement helps farmers optimize water use

Posted by in Agriculture, Scientific Studies

By Clint Thompson Knowing the best place to install soil moisture sensors in fields, and how many, helps farmers optimize their water use, says University of Georgia Cooperative Extension precision agriculture and irrigation specialist Wes Porter. “Basically, what soil moisture sensors are giving us is a point reference in that...

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CAES graduate students take to the road to explore career opportunities

By Merritt Melancon Like many other young people, plant pathology graduate student Russell Ingram’s friends have an epic road trip planned for this summer. The difference is that instead of setting off for a music festival in the desert or visiting a beach, Ingram’s pals are hitting the road in search of jobs. About two-dozen...

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Finding Dory: UF/IFAS researchers find first-ever method to farm Pacific Blue Tang

By: Beverly James, 352-273-3566, beverlymjames@ufl.edu GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Finally, it may be possible for regular folks to find their own Dory, as researchers with the University of Florida Tropical Aquaculture Laboratory have successfully raised the Pacific Blue Tang in captivity. This is the first time that researchers have...

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Rapid, low-temperature process adds weeks to milk’s shelf life

Aug 02, 16 Rapid, low-temperature process adds weeks to milk’s shelf life

Posted by in Scientific Studies

by Purdue University. A rapid heating and cooling of milk significantly reduces the amount of harmful bacteria present, extending by several weeks the shelf life of one of the most common refrigerator staples in the world, according to a Purdue University study. Bruce Applegate, Purdue associate professor in the Department of Food...

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Cinnamon may aid learning ability

 by Rush University Medical Center. Cinnamon is a delicious addition to toast, coffee and breakfast rolls. Eating the tasty household spice also might improve learning ability, according to new study results published online in the July issue of the Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology. The study by neurological scientists at Rush...

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Unlocking Cacao’s Fungal Foe

Aug 02, 16 Unlocking Cacao’s Fungal Foe

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Jan Suszkiw U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists have sequenced the frosty pod rot fungus genome. That advance could speed the development of cacao tree varieties that better withstand this costly blight. The fungus that causes frosty pod rot disease, Moniliophthora roreri, occurs in most cacao-growing countries of...

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Science Detectives Investigate a ‘Mitey’ Big Problem

By Jan Suszkiw U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists are hot on the trail of a honey bee killer, and their detective work has taken them from hives in Tucson, Arizona, to those in Bismarck, North Dakota. Led by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) supervisory research entomologist Gloria DeGrandi-Hoffman, the team is...

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Blueberries’ health benefits better than many perceive

Jul 06, 16 Blueberries’ health benefits better than many perceive

Posted by in Featured Stories, Scientific Studies

By: Brad Buck, 352-294-3303, bradbuck@ufl.edu Consumers know some of the benefits blueberries provide, but they’re less aware of the advantages of reverting aging, improving vision and memory, a new University of Florida study shows. Shuyang Qu, a doctoral student in agricultural education and communication at the University of...

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CAES plant pathology doctoral student working to maximize the productivity of Haitian farmers

Jul 06, 16 CAES plant pathology doctoral student working to maximize the productivity of Haitian farmers

Posted by in Health & Farming, Scientific Studies

By Allison Floyd  When he started college, Abraham Fulmer didn’t know he’d study peanuts, work in international development or become fascinated with Haiti. But that’s where life led him. Fulmer, a PhD student in the Department of Plant Pathology at the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,...

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Cancer-causing virus strikes genetically vulnerable horses

by Cornell University, College of Veterinary Medicine. Sarcoid skin tumors are the most common form of cancer in horses, but little is known about why the papillomavirus behind them strikes some horses and not others. A new study by an international research group led by scientists at the Baker Institute for Animal Health at...

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Average Sized ‘Dead Zone’ Predicted for Gulf of Mexico

Jul 06, 16 Average Sized ‘Dead Zone’ Predicted for Gulf of Mexico

Posted by in Featured Stories, Scientific Studies

by: TheFishSite News Desk Scientists forecast that this year’s Gulf of Mexico dead zone–an area of low to no oxygen that can kill fish and marine life – will be approximately 5,898 square miles or about the size of Connecticut, the same range as it has averaged over the last several years. The dead zone in the Gulf of...

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New Rice Flour Mixes Available To Make Yummy Treats

Jul 06, 16 New Rice Flour Mixes Available To Make Yummy Treats

Posted by in Celebration, Scientific Studies

By Sandra Avant Consumers can now buy double chocolate chip brownie, chocolate chip cookie and lemon poppy seed muffin mixes made from a rice flour blend developed by U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists that reduces oil absorption during cooking. The products are available under the brand name Choice Batter® from...

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